Tuesday, June 12th

In-Class
  • Finished presenting the last Hamilton Projects.
  • Students cleaned out their lockers.

Monday, June 11th

In-Class
  • No class because of Move-up Day.

Friday, June 8th

In-Class
  • Students presented their Science Lit. research to groups of 3/4 students.

Thursday, June 7th

In-Class
  • Students presented their Science Lit. research to groups of 3/4 students.

Wednesday, June 6th

In-Class
  • Students presented their Hamilton Projects.
  • Students watched a Liberty's Kid video on Paul Revere's "Midnight Ride".

Tuesday, June 5th

In-Class
  • Students presented their Hamilton Projects.
  • Students watched a Liberty's Kid video on Patrick Henry and his famous, "Give me liberty, or give me death" speech.

Monday, June 4th

In-Class
  • Students checked their Chapter 11 Notes.
  • Students were introduced to Chapter 11 Reading Further, which focuses on Patrick Henry and his famous speech containing the words, "Give me liberty, or give me death!" They read Chapter 11 Reading Further and completed the Reading Further activity in their ISN.
  • Students were given some practice time for their Hamilton Project. Some students will begin presenting tomorrow. Make sure to bring anything from home that you may need.

Friday, June 1st

In-Class
  • Students finished their Hamilton Project and Chapter 11 Notes.

Thursday, May 31st

In-Class
  • Students read the sections on each of the historical figures and completed their Chapter 11 Reading Notes.

Wednesday, May 30th

In-Class
  • Students participated in the Chapter 11 Debate. Public Relations Agents gave a 30 second introduction that gave their historical figure's name, occupation, accomplishments, and views on independence. Actors gave a one minute opening statement that gave at least three arguments for or against independence from Great Britain. Actors gave a one minute rebuttal, in order to refute any claims made by members of the opposite side. Investigative Reporters asked one question to each of the Actors on the opposite side to dig for more information. Finally, Actors gave a 30 second closing statement to sum up their arguments, rebuttals, and answers to questions.
  • Students will read the sections on each of the historical figures and complete their Chapter 11 Reading Notes tomorrow.

Tuesday, May 29th

In-Class
  • Students prepared for the Chapter 11 Debate, which will take place in class tomorrow.
  • Please practice tonight, if needed, and bring any necessary props/costume materials from home.

Friday, May 25th

In-Class
  • Students continued the Chapter 11 Debate Activity.

Thursday, May 24th

In-Class
  • Students continued the Chapter 11 Debate Activity.

Wednesday, May 23rd

In-Class
  • Students read Chapter 11 Section 1 to learn a little more about Loyalists and Patriots.
  • Students were introduced to the Chapter 11 Debate Activity. They picked one of six historical figures from either the Loyalist or Patriot side. They will research their figure, especially how that person felt about declaring independence from Great Britain. They will gather arguments to present during the debate and even research their mannerisms so that they bring the character to life during the debate.
  • Students read the section from Chapter 11 that corresponds to their historical figure and began collecting the appropriate notes.

Tuesday, May 22nd

In-Class
  • Students previewed Chapter 11: Declare Independence or Not? by relating to laws and services provided by the government that affect their own lives. They thought about laws/services that they enjoy and don't enjoy, as well as laws they will be able to influence when they are adults.
  • Students read Chapter 11 Introduction and filled out the Preview activity in their ISN. They had to list two arguments for loyalists staying with Great Britain and two arguments for patriots wanting to break away.
  • Students chose a side and met with students from the same side to prepare arguments for a debate. The sides chose a representative for the debate. The representatives had 1 minute to present their opening statements and 30 seconds for a rebuttal.
  • Finally, students took a vote on which side had the most convincing argument.

Monday, May 21st

In-Class
  • Students completed their Chapter 10 Comprehension Check on teachtci.com and then were given "fix-it" time in class. They were to view PowerSchool and complete any missing/incomplete assignments and revise assignments that had low scores. Students should continue to do so, and notify me by email when they want me to check the assignment again.

Friday, May 18th

In-Class
  • Disability Awareness Workshop all day.

Thursday, May 17th

In-Class
  • Students worked on a Chapter 10 Comprehension Check. They answered fill-in-the-blank, multiple choice, and show-you-know type questions using their notes and the book. This will be our final wrap up of Chapter 10 before we move onto Chapter 11: To Declare Independence or Not.

Wednesday, May 16th

In-Class
  • Students continued the Hamilton Project based on the popular musical. They worked to analyze their song to find story elements such as characters, setting, conflict, and resolution. They are also researching whether or not their song is historically accurate and providing evidence/reasoning to support. They will present to the class by choosing from different presentation levels...play a video of the song being performed, sing the song, or dress up and sing the song/dance in character.

Tuesday, May 15th

In-Class
  • Students continued the Hamilton Project based on the popular musical. They worked to analyze their song to find story elements such as characters, setting, conflict, and resolution. They are also researching whether or not their song is historically accurate and providing evidence/reasoning to support. They will present to the class by choosing from different presentation levels...play a video of the song being performed, sing the song, or dress up and sing the song/dance in character.

Monday, May 14th

In-Class
  • Students completed their Chapter 10 Quizizz. Students played a few rounds to familiarize themselves with the Chapter 10 material.
  • Students were introduced to the Hamilton Project based on the popular musical. Students chose a song from the musical from a list of school-appropriate choices. They will work to analyze their song to find story elements such as characters, setting, conflict, and resolution. They will also be required to say whether or not their song is historically accurate and provide evidence/reasoning to support. They will present to the class by choosing from different presentation levels...play a video of the song being performed, sing the song, or dress up and sing the song in character.

Thursday, May 10th

In-Class
  • 5th Grade Only: Students completed their Chapter 10 Quizizz. Students played a few rounds to familiarize themselves with the Chapter 10 material.

Wednesday, May 9th

In-Class
  • Students continued reading Chapter 10 and completed the next set of Reading Notes on Sections 5-7 in their ISN, following the principal-student metaphor.
  • Some students began to create a Quizizz on Chapter 10.
  • Students checked their Chapter 10 Reading Notes.

Tuesday, May 8th

In-Class
  • Students went over notes they took while reading Chapter 10 Introduction and Section 1.
  • Students were introduced to the metaphor of a principal-student relationship and how it compares to Great Britain and colonists. Students used this metaphor to better understand each event that shifted the feelings colonists had toward Great Britain.
  • Students read Chapter 10 Sections 2-4 and completed the Reading Notes in their ISN, following the principal-student metaphor.

Monday, May 7th

In-Class
  • Students were introduced to Chapter 10, which involves looking at the events that led to increased tension between Great Britain and the American colonies.
  • Students completed a preview activity where they compared a time in their own lives that an adult ordered them to do something and compared that to the actions Great Britain took against the colonies.
  • Students read the introduction and had to pick out the author's thesis statement and supporting details. They had to answer questions about each paragraph in the introduction. Students then read Section 1 on the French and Indian War and had to complete notes following the specific text structures for each paragraph. The note sheet is on our SS Google Classroom.

Thursday, May 3rd

In-Class
  • Students completed all Chapter 9 work. (If not, they need to finish by Tomorrow)
  • Students completed an assessment activity for Chapter 9. It was open note.
  • All Chapter 9 work is due Tomorrow!

Wednesday, May 2nd

In-Class
  • Students completed all Chapter 9 work. (If not, they need to finish by Friday)
  • Students were told the three important items to study for the assessment activity: Reading Notes, Processing, and Study Guide.
  • Students will complete an assessment activity for Chapter 9 tomorrow. It will be open note. They should look through the items listed above.
  • All Chapter 9 work is due Friday!

Tuesday, May 1st

In-Class
  • Students completed the Chapter 9 Processing activity where they had to describe colonial Williamsburg and at least 3 stops on their walking tour.
  • Students completed a 3 question study guide on our SS Google Classroom. This will help them for the assessment activity Thursday.

Monday, April 30th

In-Class
  • Students read Chapter 9 Reading Further and completed the activity in their ISN. They had to fill out a Venn Diagram comparing Williamsburg before the Great Awakening and after the Great Awakening.
  • Students reviewed their Chapter 9 Reading Notes to make sure they were complete.

Thursday, April 26th

In-Class
  • Students went on a walking tour of Colonial Williamsburg. They have to examine primary sources, read information, complete notes, and participate in an activity that would've occurred at the location in the colony. Please check out our SeeSaw classroom to see pictures.

Tuesday, April 24th

In-Class
  • Students continued the preview for Chapter 9. They read the rest of the introduction and Section 1. They completed the Reading Notes for Section 1.
  • Tomorrow, the students will go on a walking "tour" of Colonial Williamsburg. They will visit 6 different spots of the colony and complete activities that would have taken place in those spots.

Monday, April 23rd


In-Class
  • Students were introduced to Chapter 9: Colonial Williamsburg.
  • Students completed a preview activity where they compared their daily schedule to that of someone who lived in Colonial Williamsburg. We discussed the difference between jobs for young/old, boy/girl, and colonist/slave.
  • Students read and discussed the first two paragraphs of the introduction in order to connect to the last chapter on slavery and to discover the importance of this specific colony.

Thursday, April 19th

In-Class
  • Students continued to explore Minecraft Education. They continued writing proposals for its use within our upcoming units. I will review the proposals and see which direction we will go with the program's use within our social studies curriculum.

Wednesday, April 18th

In-Class
  • Students received their Minecraft Education accounts and began to explore its features. They began writing proposals for its use within our upcoming units.

Tuesday, April 17th

In-Class
  • Students completed a culminating activity on Chapter 8. They completed several Quizzz and we discussed common misconceptions. We will be moving onto Chapter 9: Colonial Williamsburg.

Monday, April 16th

In-Class
  • Students read Chapter 8 Sections 1-7 again, this time looking closely for answers to the Chapter 8 Reading Notes in their ISN.

Tuesday, April 10th

In-Class
  • Students continued Chapter 8 by watching a video on the triangular trade routes and participating in a simulation.
  • Students received their Chapter 7 Assessments. Revisions are due this Friday (4/13) in order to get the revised grade before the quarter ends. Students were told to complete revisions on a separate piece of paper. They need to describe what part of the test they are revising because there are no question numbers on the test.

Monday, April 9th

In-Class
  • Students were introduced to Chapter 8, which focuses on the slave trade within the colonies.
  • Students read the entire chapter and we discussed what they learned.

Wednesday, March 28th

In-Class
  • Students took their Chapter 7 Assessment

Monday, March 26th

In-Class
  • Students took a second vote on the colony they would most like to live in based on commercials/billboards and information from the book. We compared the results to those we got when they voted just based on the commercials/billboards. The students used their Reading Notes to help support their choices of which colonies are better or worse.
  • Students worked on completing Chapter 7 Reading Notes, Reading Further, and Processing in their ISN. Their test is Wednesday and is open note. They will be required to apply the information about the colonies.
  • Students were introduced to the new Current Event template (available on our SS Google Classroom) and began to look for current event articles for April. Students were able to pick their deadline (calendar on our SS Google Classroom).

Tuesday, March 20th

In-Class
  • Students learned more about each colony and evaluated each commercial/billboard by comparing their claims to the information in the reading. They read the sections and filled out the reading notes for Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Georgia.
  • Students also began to compare the colonies in different areas.

Monday, March 19th

In-Class
  • Students presented their Chapter 7 Billboard/Commercial Project. They presented their billboard or commercial that advertised their colony and encouraged their classmates to move to their colony.
  • We voted on the colonies they would most like to live in and came up with conclusions/generalizations for why certain colonies were popular and not popular.
  • Students began to brainstorm their most important deciding factors for choosing a colony to settle in.
  • Students will learn more about each colony and evaluate each presentation, as well as compare the colonies in many different areas.

Thursday, March 15th

In-Class
  • Students continued their work on the Chapter 7 Billboard/Commercial Project. They are creating a billboard or commercial that advertises their colony and encourages their classmates to move to their colony.
  • Chapter 7 Billboard/Commercial Project was due at the end of class today.

Wednesday, March 14th

In-Class
  • Students continued their work on the Chapter 7 Billboard/Commercial Project. They are creating a billboard or commercial that advertises their colony and encourages their classmates to move to their colony.
  • Chapter 7 Billboard/Commercial Project is due at the end of class tomorrow.

Tuesday, March 13th

In-Class
  • Students continued their work on the Chapter 7 Billboard/Commercial Project. They are creating a billboard or commercial that advertises their colony and encourages their classmates to move to their colony.

Monday, March 12th

In-Class
  • Students continued their work on the Chapter 7 Billboard/Commercial Project. They are creating a billboard or commercial that advertises their colony and encourages their classmates to move to their colony.

Friday, March 9th

In-Class
  • Students continued their work on the Chapter 7 Billboard/Commercial Project. They are creating a billboard or commercial that advertises their colony and encourages their classmates to move to their colony.

Thursday, March 8th

In-Class
  • Students continued their work on the Chapter 7 Billboard/Commercial Project. They are creating a billboard or commercial that advertises their colony and encourages their classmates to move to their colony.

Wednesday, March 7th

In-Class
  • Students continued their work with outlining Chapter 7 Section 1.
  • Students were introduced to the Chapter 7 Billboard/Commercial Project. They will create a billboard or commercial that advertises their colony and encourages their classmates to move to their colony. They picked their jobs and began researching their colony.

Tuesday, March 6th

In-Class
  • Students were introduced to the definition and purpose of outlining. They were given several examples of outlines filled out for nonfiction paragraphs on a variety of topics. They used the examples to understand the big rules of outlining...alternating between numbers (Roman numerals and regular numerals) and letters (capitals and lowercase), making sure that if you have one of something, you have a second one (if you have an (A.) you also have a (B.), and try to use parallel language (starts with all verbs, all sentences, all phrases, etc.).
  • Students practiced outlining through a paragraph about a Native American tribe that was almost wiped out because of diseases brought over by European Explorers/Settlers. Finally, they are working on outlining Chapter 7 Section 1, looking for the author's claim (the main topic) and the way he/she organized the information to help support that claim. This will set the foundation for understanding what information they are supposed to look for within the chapter.

Monday, March 5th

In-Class
  • Students researched current event articles and began organizing their presentations.
  • Students picked their own current event deadline (calendar available on our SS Google Classroom).

Tuesday, February 27th

In-Class
  • 6th grade students presented R&Es to fifth grade students.
  • We will continue presentations tomorrow.

Monday, February 26th

In-Class
  • Students watched current event presentations.
  • Students were given their Chapter 6 Assessments back. We discussed common misconceptions as we move toward Chapter 7: English Colonies.

Friday, February 16th

In-Class
  • Students watched current event presentations.
  • Students checked-in Chapter 6 work.

Thursday, February 15th

In-Class
  • Students completed the Chapter 6 Test.

Wednesday, February 14th

In-Class
  • Students had a 45 minute period in the morning to work on Chapter 6 assignments and to study.

Tuesday, February 13th

In-Class
  • Students were introduced to the Chapter 6 Assignment Checklist and Study Guide. All Chapter 6 assignments are due Thursday. The test is Thursday.

Monday, February 12th

In-Class
  • Students were introduced to the Chapter 6 Reading Further. It deals with King Philip's war with the English settlers. Students will read the Reading Further and analyze some major events that caused other major events. They will fill out the Reading Further section of their ISN. They look at the "cause" event in the first column, read the question(s) in the second column, and then answer the question(s) in the third column called "effect".
  • Students continued reading Chapter 6, filling in their reading notes on the three settlements, working on the vocabulary packet, working on the settlement questions, and working on the Reading Further.
  • Chapter 6 test will be this Thursday, with review activities occurring this week.

Thursday, February 8th

In-Class
  • Students were introduced to the Chapter 6 Settlement Questions. These questions are located on the SS Google Classroom.
  • Students continued reading Chapter 6, filling in their reading notes on the three settlements, working on the vocabulary packet, and working on the settlement questions.

Wednesday, February 7th

In-Class
  • Students were given a Chapter 6 Vocabulary Packet, as the vocabulary words become more difficult and important to understand in these later chapters. We discussed important vocabulary skills such as using words in a sentence so that they show the meaning of the word. Also, we broke words apart into their affixes to see how they change the meaning and part of speech. For example, we discussed that democrat is a noun that describes someone's political beliefs, while democratic is an adjective that describes someone or something with those beliefs. So, the suffix -ic changes nouns into adjectives.
  • Students continued reading Chapter 6 and filling in their reading notes on the three settlements and worked on the vocabulary packet.

Monday, February 5th

In-Class
  • We previewed Chapter 6 by discussing what their experience would be like if they lived and went to school in a different country. We related this to what the English settlers went through when they first set up their settlements.
  • Students read Chapter 6 Introduction and began reading about three different English settlements (Roanoke, Jamestown, and Plymouth). They began filling out the reading notes in their ISN, which involves sensory figures. Each figure is a settler from the specific settlement and the students have to complete each sentence starter by saying what the settler would have experienced (I felt..., I saw..., I listened..., etc.).
  • Students chose their due date for February Current Events. They will present on their due date. All materials are available on our SS Google Classroom. Make sure to work on it!

Friday, February 2nd

In-Class
  • Students watched a short video clip (4-5 minutes) on each explorer. We discussed any extra information that they learned about each explorer.
  • Students had to write a high-quality question that they would ask each explorer based on the information learned in each video.

Thursday, February 1st

In-Class
  • Students shared their findings for their assigned explorer, while the class wrote down the notes to complete the entire explorer matrix.
  • Students completed an explorer challenge. They were given 10 challenge questions that required them to compare explorers in order to answer deeper-level questions. Some example questions: Which four explorers had the greatest impact on Native Americans? What was the most common motive for exploring the New World?
  • Students completed a processing activity. They had to look at a map of exploration routes and use what they remembered about the explorers to match each route with the correct explorer. Then using a map scale, they had to match routes to distances traveled in both kilometers and miles.

Wednesday, January 31st

In-Class
  • Partnerships continued working on a specific explorer. They read the section matching the explorer. They filled in the notes for their explorer in their notebooks. They completed a larger version of the notes to add to our classroom wall matrix.
  • Students will share their findings tomorrow, while the class writes down the notes.

Tuesday, January 30th

In-Class
  • Students read Chapter 5 Introduction and discussed what they would be reading about.
  • Students helped me complete a column for the explorer matrix as an example for what they would be doing.
  • Partnerships were assigned a specific explorer. They read the section matching the explorer. They filled in the notes for their explorer in their notebooks. They completed a larger version of the notes to add to our classroom wall matrix.

Monday, January 29th

In-Class
  • Students finished presenting their current events in the form of a "news report".
  • Students previewed Chapter 5, which looks at why explorers may have settled in the New World. They thought about the phrase, "first come, first served" and came up with a real life example where they experienced that phrase. They thought about if they were being helped or hurt by the phrase in the experience. They thought about their feelings in the experience and what the other side might be feeling. Finally, they related this experience to the experience explorers from different European countries might've had, as well as the American Indians.
  • Students began to discuss several important questions for the chapter...What countries did the explorers come from? What languages did they speak? How did they get to the New World? What dangers might they have faced? Why did they come?
  • We will begin reading tomorrow and start to fill out our explorer matrix.

Thursday, January 25th

In-Class
  • Students presented their current event in the form of a "news report".
  • We will finish presentations on Monday.

Wednesday, January 24th

In-Class
  • Students were shown the rubric for this assignment.
  • Students continued analyzing their current event for the appropriate information and completed their Google Slideshow.
  • Students practiced their "news report" presentation. They will share their current event article tomorrow in the form of a news report.
  • All directions, examples, templates, and rubrics for this assignment are available on the social studies Google Classroom.

Tuesday, January 23rd

In-Class
  • Students were reminded of the purpose of current events and the expectations of this assignment.
  • Students continued with finding current articles and analyzing for the appropriate information.
  • All directions, examples, templates, and rubrics for this assignment are available on the social studies Google Classroom.

Monday, January 22nd

In-Class
  • Students were introduced to current events monthly assignment.
  • Students worked on finding current articles and analyzing for the appropriate information.
  • All directions, examples, and templates for this assignment are available on the social studies Google Classroom.

Friday, January 19th

In-Class
  • Students finished presenting skits and viewed a preview movie for their science invention unit.

Thursday, January 18th

In-Class
  • Students presented their Chapter 4 Reading Further projects (see description on previous date).
  • Students received note sheets (Arbaugh note sheet / Brown note sheet) to fill in the missing blanks while groups presented their summaries. This allowed the students to get the information for the other images/key events that spurred exploration of the New World.

Wednesday, January 17th

In-Class
  • Students continued their work with the Chapter 4 Reading Further project (see description on previous date).
  • Students will present tomorrow!

Tuesday, January 16th

In-Class
  • Students read Chapter 4 Reading Further with their research teams.
  • Teams were assigned one of four images, depicting an important event that occurred in Europe in the 1400s/1500s to spur exploration of the New World. They worked with their teams to collect information about the event from the reading. They used the information to come up with a title for the image, a 1-3 sentence summary for the event, and a skit that brings the image to life. They will continue working on this tomorrow and some groups will get to present.

Friday, January 12th

In-Class
  • Students received missing work/incomplete work reports, if they have any missing or incomplete assignments. We discussed, making sure they check PowerSchool often so they can keep up with their assignments and grades.
  • Students received extra academic lab time to catch up on assignments, work on Science Lit. projects, or get ahead on assignments.

Thursday, January 11th

In-Class
  • Students went over answers to reading notes.
  • Then then had to sort the artifacts we have been examining into 3 categories: motives for exploration, new product from the New World, or technology for exploration. They had to defend their choices. This discussion leads us into the next chapter, where we learn about specific explorers, including their motivations, routes, and discoveries.

Wednesday, January 10th

In-Class
  • Students worked on the reading notes for Chapter 4 with the guest teacher.

Tuesday, January 9th

In-Class
  • Students met with their Chapter 4 research team to read the chapter introduction and find out the "who,what,where,when,why, and how" of the chapter. They used the answers to create a one to two sentence summary of what they think they should learn from the chapter.
  • Students were introduced to the "Reading Notes" process for the chapter. They will work with their research team to "dive" for artifacts from a sunken ship that European explorers would have traveled to the New World in. They will keep track of where they found it in the ship, find the chapter section that seems to match the artifact, read that section to learn about the artifact and why it was important to the explorers. We completed object A1 together. The students will complete the rest of the note activity tomorrow.

Monday, January 8th

In-Class
  • After reviewing individual assessments over the weekend, a consistent pattern was observed. Students did not consistently follow the directions when writing their tribe comparisons. They were not including how natural resources or climate affected the cultures similarly or differently. Unfortunately, this is the major standard for the chapter, so I needed to get another assessment point. The assessment was modified to focus on only their tribe and one other tribe, as well as only one area of comparison.
  • The students took the modified test today. These retakes will be graded and used as the individual assessment grade.

Thursday, January 4th

In-Class
  • Some students needed to finish the gallery walk, so other students got to complete the Kahoots! they made earlier on in the unit.
  • Students previewed Chapter 4 by thinking of tools they would need to help guide them to a vacation spot they would want to go, as well as tools they would need once they got to their destination. We connected this exercise to the topic of the chapter, "How and Why Europeans Came to the New World".

Wednesday, January 3rd

In-Class
  • We discussed some common issues with the Chapter 3 Native American posters and the students received their own copy of the graded rubric for this project. Please look at the rubric for specific feedback.
  • The students completed an individual assessment today so that they are not just assessed as a group for this chapter. They took a gallery walk around the room, looking at posters of other tribes/regions made by their peers. They had to compare the tribe they researched to the tribe of the poster they were looking at. They had to explain how natural resources influenced the transportation, clothing, food, tools/weapons, and housing for their tribe compared to the tribe on the poster.

Friday, December 22nd

In-Class
  • No class based on our afternoon Holiday Party.
  • Students turned in their posters yesterday, which will be graded over break. Please check PowerSchool for grades. A graded copy of the rubric will come home with each student to show specific feedback.

Thursday, December 21st

In-Class
  • Students finished their final project for Chapter 3. They were researching a region, and a tribe within that region, to explore at a deeper level than in the book. They created a poster that showcases the region and tribe.

Wednesday, December 20th

In-Class
  • Students continued their final project for Chapter 3. They are researching a region, and a tribe within that region, to explore at a deeper level than in the book. They are creating a poster that showcases the region and tribe. They need to use at least 2 sources, but one of the sources needs to be a trade book so that they practice research using different types of sources. Posters will be due by the end of class Thursday!

Tuesday, December 19th

In-Class
  • Students continued their final project for Chapter 3. They will choose a region, and a tribe within that region, to explore at a deeper level than in the book. They will create a poster that showcases the region and tribe. They need to use at least 2 sources, but one of the sources needs to be a trade book so that they practice research using different types of sources.

Monday, December 18th

In-Class
  • Students were introduced to their final project for Chapter 3. They will choose a region, and a tribe within that region, to explore at a deeper level than in the book. They will create a poster that showcases the region and tribe. They need to use at least 2 sources, but one of the sources needs to be a trade book so that they practice research using different types of sources.

Friday, December 15th

In-Class
  • Students finished writing their Chapter 3 Reading Further skit and acted the skits out through an interaction with another tribe.
  • Students filled in missing notes based on information they learned from the skits.

Wednesday, December 13th

In-Class
  • Students continued to fill in the information for their attribute on the matrix for each cultural region.
  • Students finished making a Kahoot! game.
  • Students posted Kahoot! game for their group on our SS Google Classroom and we played some of the games today.
  • Students will finish writing their Chapter 3 Reading Further skit tomorrow and act the skits out through an interaction with another tribe.

Monday, December 11th

In-Class
  • Students watched the movie, "Wonder".

Friday, December 8th

In-Class
  • Students continued to fill in the information for their attribute on the matrix for each cultural region.
  • Students used the matrix to write "compare and contrast" questions. They collaborated on making a Kahoot! game.
  • Students posted Kahoot! game for their group on our SS Google Classroom. Hopefully we will get to play these on Tuesday!

Thursday, December 7th

In-Class
  • Some students continued their work with Chapter 3 Reading Notes.
  • Students were introduced to the next activity. They learned about compare and contrast matrices. We compared a matrix to a venn diagram. The major difference being that a matrix defines the items being compared as well as the attributes being compared. A venn diagram leaves the comparison to interpretation. The matrix they received had the 7 cultural regions across the top as WHAT was being compared and attributes down the side (such as climate, physical features, natural resources) as HOW they were being compared.
  • Students were assigned one attribute and had to fill in the information for their attribute for each cultural region.
  • Students used the matrix to write "compare and contrast" questions. They collaborated on making a Kahoot! game. We will play the games tomorrow.

Wednesday, December 6th

In-Class
  • Students read the first two paragraphs of each section in Chapter 3. They had to label where in the United States they thought each region was located based on clues about the environment from the text. They listed the tribes that were located there. Finally, they looked at artifacts from the seven cultural regions and had to pick which artifacts went with this region based on the resources available in the region it would take to make the artifact and how the artifact would be useful in this region's environment.

Tuesday, December 5th

In-Class
  • Students read the first two paragraphs of Chapter 3 Section 2: The Northwest Coast Cultural Region. They had to label where in the United States they thought this region was located based on clues about the environment from the text. They listed the tribes that were located there. Finally, they looked at artifacts from the seven cultural regions and had to pick which artifacts went with this region based on the resources available in the region it would take to make the artifact and how the artifact would be useful in this region's environment.
  • Students will continue this same process with the next 6 cultural regions tomorrow.

Monday, December 4th

In-Class
  • We reviewed the Chapter 2 Quiz, including correct answers, as well as the common misconceptions. The most common errors seemed to come from direction following, rather than lack of content knowledge. For example, many students gave two correct objects the tribe made, but listed the resources they would've used to make the objects instead of saying how the objects would help them survive.
  • Students previewed Chapter 3 by completing an activity requiring them to label where they would use different objects on a map of the United States. We related this to how the region we live in affects some of the things we do. We then connected this to the 7 cultural regions that historians divided the American Indian tribes into and the common cultures they may have shared.
  • Students read the introduction to Chapter 3.

Thursday, November 30th

In-Class
  • We talked about study skills. We talked about how teachers usually give study guides, but that those are broad items they need to narrow down, and then find the specific information for each item. The broad topics they were told to study from their checklist were posted on a Google Slide at the front of the room. Students were asked to narrow down the broad topics into more specific items they should locate in the textbook. Here are some study ideas we came up with in Brown's Class and Arbaugh's Class.
  • We also discussed HOW to study. Some students made flashcards, some made study sheets/outlines, and others used technology like Google Slides or Kahoot.
  • We played a student-created Kahoot as a whole group at the end of class.
  • Chapter 2 Quiz is TOMORROW (12/01).
  • Please see Chapter 2 Task Checklist for specific details on when everything was due this week.

Wednesday, November 29th

In-Class
  • Students shared their winter counts with a partner. They had to guess what each pictograph was showing. They also discussed similarities and differences between their winter counts. Finally, they discussed how their environment plays a factor in the events they chose to draw. We related this to the information in the chapter.
  • Students continued to work on items from the Chapter 2 Task Checklist. The "Processing" activity in their ISN is due at the beginning of class TOMORROW. The checklist will be due this Friday. They also have a quiz on Chapter 2 this Friday. It will be one question with multiple steps. If students study the items identified on the checklist, they will be prepared. They will also have time to study in class tomorrow.

Tuesday, November 28th

In-Class
  • Chapter 1 test corrections were due today (unless you were absent).
  • We reviewed our Chapter 2 Sections 3-4 notes as a whole group through the "favorite no/favorite yes" activity. Anonymous student examples are shown and the class picks out why I would say it's an example of a favorite no or favorite yes. My "favorite no" example showcases a common misconception that many students exhibited. My "favorite yes" example showcases a high-quality product.
  • Students continued to work on items from the Chapter 2 Task Checklist. The "Recording Lakota History" Google Slideshow was due at the end of class today. The "Winter Count" activity is due at the beginning of class TOMORROW. The checklist will be due this Friday. They also have a quiz on Chapter 2 this Friday. It will be one question with multiple steps. If students study the items identified on the checklist, they will be prepared.

Monday, November 27th

In-Class
  • Students who let me keep their TCI Chapter 1 Test over break, were given their tests back. Their test grade in PowerSchool will not change, but their final course grade should reflect the points they earned back by corrections. Students who kept their tests over break need to finish the test correction process and turn in their test to me tomorrow. They need to go to our SS Google Classroom and pull up the Test Correction Google Form. They need to fill out the information on each page of the form completely for EACH question they got INCORRECT. The form does not save answers until the student goes to the end of the form and clicks "submit". Once submitted, students can revise the form and resubmit. These corrections are due Tuesday, November 28th.
  • Students received a Chapter 2 Task Checklist complete with activity descriptions, due dates, and a timeline. Students worked on the tasks from this checklist. The checklist will be due this Friday. They also have a quiz on Chapter 2 this Friday. It will be one question with multiple steps. If students study the items I identified would be on the quiz from the checklist, they will be prepared.

Tuesday, November 21st

In-Class
  • Students were handed their graded TCI Chapter 1 Test. We discussed the test correction process. They need to go to our SS Google Classroom and pull up the Test Correction Google Form. They need to fill out the information on each page of the form completely for EACH question they got INCORRECT. The form does not save answers until the student goes to the end of the form and clicks "submit". Once submitted, students can revise the form and resubmit. These corrections are due Tuesday, November 28th.
  • Students began working on the Reading Further activity for Chapter 2. They worked alone or with a partner to read about a specific tribe: The Lakota. They created a Google Slideshow in our SS Google Classroom to show what they read about. They have to have AT LEAST 1 FACT and PHOTOGRAPH/ILLUSTRATION per slide that helps support the title of the slide. This will be due Tuesday, November 28th.

Friday, November 17th

In-Class
  • Students read Chapter 2 Section 3 and 4 about four different environments that early peoples settled in America and a specific tribe that settled in the arctic ice fields. They wrote summaries of each section using assigned vocabulary words.

Thursday, November 16th

In-Class
  • After our discussion about a Native American Hopi Origin Story, students analyzed a map of possible migration routes according to one scientific theory. Students made generalizations about the map, such as why the first people in America traveled the way they did and made choices to settle where they did.
  • Students read Chapter 2 Section 2 about early migration routes and wrote a summary of the section using assigned vocabulary words.

Wednesday, November 15th

In-Class
  • Students completed a preview activity for Chapter 2, where they had to sit in a place where they are most comfortable. They described the place and then had to say what they would do to make it even more comfortable. We connected this to how the earliest people in America had to choose where to settle, and then adapt to their environment.
  • Students read Chapter 2 Introduction and discussed what they would learn about in the chapter.
  • Students read Chapter 2 Section 1 and discussed Native American origin stories.

Tuesday, November 14th

In-Class
  • Students completed the Chapter 1 Test.

Monday, November 13th

In-Class
  • Students completed a skills challenge/review made of questions they created. They were asked to complete as many questions as they could without a map or book, and then given ample time to complete anything they didn't know using resources.
  • Chapter 1 Test will be Tomorrow (11/14).

Friday, November 10th

In-Class
  • Students continued designing challenge cards for their own geography challenge that we will play on Monday to study for the test. They used a combination political and physical map to come up with questions in three different categories: geographic skills, geographic features, and states/capitals.
  • Students continued creating their digital Chapter 1 comprehensive study guide. Students go through each section of the chapter online and complete the interactive tutorial. Once they have all the correct answers, they take a screenshot and paste the screenshot on Google Slide. After they did all 9 sections, they had to create a study plan for concepts or terms they still aren't understanding or don't have memorized in each section. Students can use this to study for their test next week. Any student who didn't finish the study guide needs to complete it by Monday!
  • Chapter 1 Test will be on Tuesday, November 14th.

Thursday, November 9th

In-Class
  • Students continued designing challenge cards for their own geography challenge that we will play on Monday to study for the test. They used a combination political and physical map to come up with questions in three different categories: geographic skills, geographic features, and states/capitals.
  • Students who finished their challenge cards began creating their digital Chapter 1 comprehensive study guide. Students go through each section of the chapter online and complete the interactive tutorial. Once they have all the correct answers, they take a screenshot and paste the screenshot on Google Slide. After they did all 9 sections, they had to create a study plan for concepts they still aren't understanding in each section. Students can use this to study for their test next week.
  • Chapter 1 Test will be on Tuesday, November 14th.

Wednesday, November 8th

In-Class
  • We began class with a review of textbook structure. Some students are forgetting how to use structure to help with comprehension and filling in notes. For example, students should use the introduction of a section to identify the major topics that will be addressed in that section. Then, they should look at the first sentence of a paragraph (topic sentence) to see what they will learn about in that paragraph. They can use these clues to help them fill in the appropriate notes in their ISNs. Some students needed to finish reading and filling in notes for Chapter 1 Sections 6-9.
  • Students read a primary source; the memoirs of a women who experienced traveling to and living in California during the Gold Rush. They drew a route they would take and wrote a journal entry from the perspective of someone traveling that route. They had to include geographic features they would encounter along the way. Some students needed to finish this activity.
  • Students who were finished with the work above, began designing challenge cards for their own geography challenge that we will play to study for the test. They used a combination political and physical map to come up with questions in three different categories: geographic skills, geographic features, and states/capitals.

Monday, November 6th

In-Class
  • Students previewed the "Reading Further" reading and activity. We discussed the effects of geography on U.S. history in the context of the California Gold Rush of 1849. Students compared the pros and cons of overland and water routes when traveling from the east coast to get to California.
  • Students read and filled in notes about the climates and vegetation of different areas in the U.S.
  • Students read and filled in notes about how geography affects where people live and how cartographers make different types of maps.
  • Students read a primary source, the memoirs of a women who experienced traveling to and living in California during the Gold Rush. They drew a route they would take and wrote a journal entry from the perspective of someone traveling that route. They had to include geographic features they would encounter along the way.
  • All missing/incomplete work for Q1 was due by TODAY!

Friday, November 3rd

In-Class
  • Students finished the final geography challenge: Challenge D- the political and physical feature maps of the United States.
  • Students read and filled in notes about the climates and vegetation of different areas in the U.S.
  • Students read and filled in notes about how geography affects where people live and how cartographers make different types of maps.
  • Students received missing/incomplete assignment reports yesterday. All missing/incomplete work due by Monday!

Thursday, November 2nd

In-Class
  • Students worked on the final geography challenge: Challenge D- the political and physical feature maps of the United States.
  • Students received missing/incomplete assignment reports. All missing/incomplete work due by Monday!

Wednesday, November 1st

In-Class
  • Students completed Geography Challenge C, identifying and labeling landforms and bodies of water. We checked answers together.
  • Students previewed Chapter 1 Section 4 and 5 by analyzing political and physical feature maps. Students then read the sections.
  • We set up the final challenge, Challenge D, and will complete tomorrow in class.

Monday, October 30th

In-Class
  • Students completed Geography Challenge B for the Chapter 1 Section 2 reading that we started on in class. This challenge has them naming and labeling locations on a map of the world when given coordinates.
  • We checked the answers and previewed Section 3. Students began reading about land forms and bodies of water and completing Geography Challenge C.

Friday, October 27th

In-Class
  • Students previewed Chapter 1 Section 2, read the section, and started Geography Challenge B.

Thursday, October 26th

In-Class
  • We went over the Geography Challenge directions and expectations. Students will complete a Geography Challenge for each section of this chapter. They will work with their group to fill out maps dealing with the information in that section.
  • Students previewed Chapter 1 Section 1 and read with group. They completed Geography Challenge A, where they filled out a map of the world with regards to continents, oceans, etc. We went over the answers together.

Wednesday, October 25th

In-Class
  • No class due to field trip.
  • We will start our Geography Challenge tomorrow!

Monday, October 23rd

In-Class
  • Students previewed the first TCI chapter to activate background knowledge.
  • Students participated in a preview activity involving them drawing two different maps of the same area. The first map had no grid lines or points of reference. They met with several other students to compare the accuracy of their maps. They then drew a second map that had grid lines and coordinates. They found that this map was way more accurate. Students concluded that mapmakers (cartographers) must use lines of reference to help make their maps more accurate. This will connect to lines of latitude and longitude later on in the chapter.
  • Some students finished reading the introduction to the chapter.

Friday, October 20th

In-Class
  • Students practiced changing questions into the other form and picked their three strongest questions. They used the questions to help learn more about the question focus.
  • This will help them decide what the most important topics in our first social studies chapter will be and create high quality questions to guide their inquiry.

Thursday, October 19th

In-Class
  • Students had a shortened class period because of assembly. It was the perfect amount of time to introduce Question Formulation Technique (QFT).
  • They are learning QFT to prepare them for the inquiry journey through their social studies textbooks starting next week. Learning to create high quality questions is an important skill to guide their inquiry.
  • They were told the question rules: Write as many questions as they can in the allotted time. Don't stop to answer, discuss, or judge any question. Write exactly what someone says. Change any statement into a question.
  • Then they were shown the Question Focus: a map of the world, showing the frequency of lightning strikes in average strikes per kilometer.
  • Next, they were given 5 minutes to write as many questions as they could. We then discussed the difference between open-ended and closed-ended questions and the advantages and disadvantages of each.
  • They looked at their own questions and labeled them as close-ended or open-ended.
  • Tomorrow they will practice changing questions into the other form and pick their three strongest questions. They will use the questions to help learn more about the question focus.

Wednesday, October 18th

In-Class
  • Students continued to present their "Finding Main Ideas and Details" activity while some students finished their "Analyzing Primary Sources" assignment.
  • Students were formatively assessed on Primary vs Secondary Sources to check for understanding.

Tuesday, October 17th

In-Class
  • Students turned in their "Finding Main Ideas and Details" activity. Volunteers presented at the end of class.
  • Students examined a primary source (a letter written by Columbus to King Ferdinand) and answered important questions.

Monday, October 16th

In-Class
  • Students finished their "Finding Main Ideas and Details" activity from last week. Volunteers will present tomorrow.
  • Students were introduced to the last social studies skill in isolation before we move on to the required content and our textbooks. Students learned about Primary and Secondary sources last week.
  • Students examined a primary source (a letter written by Columbus to King Ferdinand) and answered important questions. Students will finish tomorrow.

Friday, October 13th

In-Class
  • Students were given time to catch up on missing assignments (there are still a few not done). Please check Powerschool and check in with your child. If they need a Scholastic article to complete the work, you can find steps to access on the Social Studies Resources page by the link above.
  • Students continued their "Finding Main Ideas and Details" activity from yesterday.

Thursday, October 12th

In-Class
  • Students learned about the next social studies skills we will use this year, "Finding Main Ideas and Details" and "Analyzing Primary and Secondary Sources", and added them to their concept maps.
  • Students began our next practice activity involving "Finding Main Ideas and Details". They were to read the Junior Scholastic article, "Mission to the Sun!" and complete a Google Slideshow by finding the main idea and details to support. They then synthesized a cohesive summary by putting together the main idea and details they found.

Wednesday, October 11th

In-Class
  • Students worked on a science activity to simulate many of the same skills they would use on our cancelled field trip to the Rouge River.
  • Students will continue to work on their "Finding Author's Purpose/Claim and Analyzing Multiple Perspectives" activity tomorrow and begin a new social studies skill as well.

Tuesday, October 10th

In-Class
  • Students continued to read article, "Challenging Columbus".
  • Students completed "Identifying Author's Purpose/Claim and Analyzing Multiple Perspectives" assignment.
  • Students had to identify the purpose of the article from these choices: Persuade, Inform, or Entertain and support with an explanation.
  • Students identified the author's claim.
  • Students analyzed the article to find the main issue, the multiple perspectives, and the reasons each perspective presented.
  • Students wrote a summary of their opinion on this issue: Should Columbus Day, Indigenous Peoples Day, Both, or Neither be celebrated as a national holiday?

Monday, October 9th

In-Class
  • We discussed results of Vocabulary Strategies and Figurative Language assignment. (These grades are in PowerSchool)
  • Students learned about Finding Author's Purpose/Claim and Analyzing Multiple Perspectives and added both skills to their "Skills I Will Use This Year" concept map.
  • Students previewed new article, "Challenging Columbus" using the THIEVES strategy to activate prior knowledge.

Friday, October 6th

In-Class
  • Students used our vocabulary strategies and figurative language knowledge to better understand our Scholastic article.
  • They were given words from the article that would be new or unfamiliar to them. They had to infer the meaning of the words based on what the text gave them and the vocabulary strategies they used. They also had to identify the strategy they used to figure out each word: context clues, apposition, or word structure.
  • They examined and discussed the article title: "Can Your Phone Testify Against You?". They had to explain the figurative and literal meaning behind the title.

Thursday, October 5th

In-Class
  • Students watched a short clip on the Bill of Rights and discussed what they learned.
  • Students received and previewed their new issue of Junior Scholastic.
  • Students previewed our focus article, "Can Your Phone Testify Against You?", using the THIEVES strategy.
  • Students read the article.
  • Tomorrow we will use our vocabulary strategies and figurative language knowledge to better understand our Scholastic article.

Wednesday, October 4th

In-Class
  • Students continued Figurative Language Activity. They worked with a partner to find a strong example of a figurative language phrase. They wrote the phrase at the top of a poster. They wrote and illustrated the literal meaning of the phrase on one side of the poster, and the figurative meaning of the phrase on the other.
  • Students shared their posters and discussed, checking for correctness with meanings.
  • Tomorrow we will use our vocabulary strategies and figurative language knowledge to read our next Scholastic article.

Tuesday, October 3rd

In-Class
  • Students added two new social studies skills to their concept maps: vocabulary strategies and understanding figurative language.
  • Vocabulary strategies: use context clues, apposition, and word structure. Also discussed why this skill would be important in social studies.
  • Understanding figurative language: literal vs. figurative meaning, as well as different types of figurative language (similes, metaphors, personification, hyperbole, symbolism, idioms, adages, proverbs) and discussed why understanding figurative language would be important in social studies.
  • Students began Figurative Language Activity. They will work with a partner to find a strong example of a figurative language phrase. They will write the phrase at the top of a poster. They will write and illustrate the literal meaning of the phrase on one side of the poster, and the figurative meaning of the phrase on the other.

Monday, October 2nd

In-Class
  • Students continued the Google Classroom activity to practice the three new topics/skills we discussed. They will answer questions that involve explicit and implicit information, as well as collect evidence to cite for essay questions regarding the article we have been reading.
  • Students who finished the Google activity were able to post pictures of their Graphic Aid Explorations on our Seesaw classroom. Make sure to check them out!
  • Students received graded rubrics for the Graphic Aid Explorations and the grades are in Powerschool.

Friday, September 29th

In-Class
  • We continued to discuss explicit information, implicit information (inference), and citing evidence as students decided how to organize their concept maps. The maps will be used later on to help students remember what the strategies are, as well as how and when to use them. They were also challenged to make connections between related strategies.
  • Students began Google Classroom activity to practice the three new topics/skills we discussed. They will answer questions that involve explicit and implicit information, as well as collect evidence to cite for essay questions regarding the article we have been reading.

Thursday, September 28th

In-Class
  • Students reflected on how previewing "The High Cost of Fast Fashion" Scholastic article using the THIEVES strategy helped them read the article last night.
  • We discussed the parts of a concept map (nodes, connectors, labels, branches) and students began to create their own as we discussed some of the social studies skills they will use this year.
  • We discussed explicit information, implicit information (inference), and citing evidence as they decided how to organize their concept maps. The maps will be used later on to help students remember what the strategies are, as well as how and when to use them. It will also allow them to make connections between related strategies.

Wednesday, September 27th

In-Class
  • Students met with their table groups to confirm information they collected on their element of THIEVES.
  • Students broke up into expert groups to teach their information to other students, as well as receive information on the other elements of THIEVES.
  • Students began to read "The High Cost of Fast Fashion" Scholastic article in class, now that they have previewed the text. They must finish reading for homework.

Tuesday, September 26th

In-Class
  • Students discussed why they think viewing a text before reading is important and what areas they need to look at. They watched a short video clip on previewing texts and discussed anything new they learned. The biggest conclusion was that previewing texts helps to activate prior knowledge, which helps them connect and retain the information better.
  • Students were introduced to the THIEVES strategy for previewing (Title, Headings, Introduction, Every first sentence, Visuals and vocabulary, End of chapter questions, and Summary).
  • We went over the guiding questions for the Title element using the Scholastic article, "The High Cost of Fast Fashion", and filled in notes based on our discussion. Students were assigned one element to focus on for the article. They must finish their one area for homework, if they didn't finish in class. We will share out their information tomorrow.
  • HW: Finish your ASSIGNED AREA ONLY on the T.H.I.E.V.E.S. graphic organizer for the "High Cost of Fast Fashion" Scholastic article. Use the "Elements of T.H.I.E.V.E.S." sheet with the guiding questions to help you.

Monday, September 25th

In-Class
  • Due to many questions from students and parents regarding grading/PowerTeacher, I reminded students of policies discussed at the beginning of the year. Many students did not turn in their note sheet assignment or they didn't put their names on it. An assignment is considered missing and is marked as a zero until I receive the assignment or I can figure out which no-name assignment belongs to which student. Once these issues are taken care of, the zero goes away and the proper credit is given.
  • We discussed the rubric for the Graphic Aid Exploration activity and stressed the importance of the generalization/conclusion portion.
  • Students were urged to revise based on our discussion, and were given ample time to do this revision.
  • Students volunteered to share their projects and gave great examples of strong generalizations/conclusions.
  • Graphic Aid Challenge scores are in PowerTeacher, but the scores will not count toward final grades because it was the students' first attempt at the skill. The scores are there for feedback purposes only. If you wish to see more detailed feedback, have your child log in to his/her school Gmail account and show you the results. I have provided a picture of each graphic aid below to use as a reference.
Recycling Graph.jpgClothes Map.jpg

Friday, September 22nd

In-Class
  • We discussed the difference between a conclusion and a generalization based on struggles I'm seeing with these areas. Basically, we boiled it down to a conclusion using data/information from our graphic aids and our own background knowledge to come up with an idea that is true, that isn't stated right on the graphic aid. We said a generalization is basically a conclusion, but it is something that COULD happen, we just don't know for sure. Example: A graph shows favorite snacks in our classroom. Snacks like chips, cookies, and pretzels are the most popular, while snacks like fruits and vegetables are the least popular. We could generalize that kids tend to like unhealthier food because they are sweet, greasy, and taste better.
  • Students were shown a graph and had to work in groups to come up with a "right there" observation, as well as a conclusion or generalization. They wrote them on sticky notes and defended their reasoning, before we decided which category to stick them in.
  • Students worked on revising the conclusions and generalizations on their Graphic Aid Explorations, using the information we went over.

Thursday, September 21st

In-Class
  • Students continued their work on analyzing graphic aids.
  • Students were introduced to a graphic aid exploration, where they printed off their own graphic aid based on an area of interest or expertise. They filled out an analysis for the aid, such as title/purpose, headings/labels/keys/purpose, information or data shown, and 5 conclusions or generalizations they could make using the data and their background knowledge.
  • Students are being challenged by the conclusions/generalizations. We will continue that work tomorrow in class.

Wednesday, September 20th

In-Class
  • Students began their work on learning important social studies skills. The skill focus this week is "graphic aids".
  • Students watched a presentation on the types of graphic aids and their purposes, jotted notes on their own copy of the presentation, and learned the steps to analyzing a graphic aid.
  • Students completed two online graphic aid challenges in our Google Classroom, using two different graphic aids from our Scholastic news (a graph and a table). The challenges provided instant feedback to help improve their understanding of the analysis of graphic aids.

Principles of Patriot Week Presentations